What’s ahead for 2023
Jan23

What’s ahead for 2023

Executive Director, Upper Valley Business Alliance Happy New Year, Upper Valley! Do you make New Year’s resolutions? For the last couple years, everything seemed too unsettled to make plans, but this year I feel hopeful. Sure, we have much to work on but given where we have been in the last two years, doesn’t 2023 feel ripe with possibilities? That is my resolution for this year — to focus on the positive! At this time of year, I am...

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‘Getting back to that pre-COVID pace’
Jan23

‘Getting back to that pre-COVID pace’

Valley News Correspondent During the height of the pandemic, restaurants were ordered to shut down indoor dining and when they were allowed to reopen, seating was limited and there had to be adequate space between tables with barriers between booths. Many establishments improved or added takeout and started using more delivery services to keep business operating. While those days appear to be finally behind the dining industry for...

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Market slows down, but remains strong
Jan23

Market slows down, but remains strong

Valley News Correspondent The area’s residential housing market has slowed after a pandemic-fueled buying surge that sent home prices soaring — but area real estate agents don’t foresee a slump in the year ahead. Realtors and others who follow market trends of single-family home sales generally agree that the low inventory in the Upper Valley — and thus far a good economy — will keep prices strong in the coming year. But with...

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‘The very best part of the business is the people’
Jan23

‘The very best part of the business is the people’

For the Valley News Nancy Smith is the sole proprietor of the Shaker Hill Inn Bed and Breakfast in Enfield. She has been in the hospitality business since coming to the Upper Valley in the late 1990s from Virginia. While the COVID-19 pandemic and Airbnb have impacted the business, Smith maintains an optimistic outlook. She finds the people she meets at her B&B to be the best part of running the business. Question: In what ways did...

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Some remote workers are doubling up on jobs

The Washington PostWorking multiple jobs is nothing new. With minimum wage lagging far behind the cost of living in the United States, many workers make ends meet through a patchwork of full- and part-time jobs — some working freelance gigs that add up to more than 40 hours a week without the benefits of full-time employee status. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in August nearly 7.5 million workers, or 4.7 percent of the...

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NH business failures rose in September

New Hampshire Business ReviewNew Hampshire bankruptcy filings jumped substantially in September compared to last year — the first year-over-year increase since the pandemic began in the spring of 2020.The 62 bankruptcies recorded in September matches the number filed in August, but it was 30 percent higher than the 48 filed in September 2021. September’s 62 filings is one shy of the highest monthly total (there were 63 in March) so...

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Information on the go
Oct13

Information on the go

Director of Marketing and Philanthropy at Advance Transit Public transportation is crucial to everyday life in both urban and rural communities. It offers a sustainable form of travel that provides access to jobs, schools, health care, shopping and other much-needed services. In this region of New England, buses are often used for daily public transit, and there are many moving parts that keep transit agencies running – both literally...

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Poshmark deal points to more acquisitions in resale market
Oct13

Poshmark deal points to more acquisitions in resale market

BloombergThe world’s biggest brands have had enough.After watching online marketplaces rack up billions in revenue from secondhand sales of their goods, brands ranging from Lululemon Athletica to Jimmy Choo are aiming for their own piece of a resale market that Coresight Research projects to hit $30 billion in the U.S. next year.“We have seen just really an explosion in resale,” said Erin Schmidt, senior analyst at Coresight. “Every...

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What goes into road signs in Vermont?
Oct13

What goes into road signs in Vermont?

Valley News Correspondent In 1969, Vermont became the first state in the nation to pass a sign law. Motorists traveling through the state — whether they live in Vermont or are visiting — will certainly notice that large, obtrusive signs announcing businesses, state attractions, or pretty much anything else are nowhere to be found along state roads like they are in many other states. Sign placement, wording and more are carefully...

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