Consumer Confidential: A Big Political Battle Over Dodd-Frank Financial Reforms Is Coming in 2016

Forgive and forget. Or just pretend that banks’ greedy and reckless behavior never happened. That seems to be the sentiment behind what’s certain to be one of the biggest political battles in 2016: whether we should roll back financial reforms put in place after the financial meltdown that nearly brought the global economy to its knees. At issue is what’s known as Dodd-Frank, aka the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer...

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Former Rep. Mike Oxley Dies at 71
Jan03

Former Rep. Mike Oxley Dies at 71

New York — Mike Oxley, the former Ohio congressman who co-sponsored the landmark Sarbanes-Oxley Act requiring corporate executives to vouch for company financials in the wake of the Enron and WorldCom accounting scandals, has died at age 71. He died Jan. 1 in McLean, Va., according to his wife, Patricia Oxley. The cause was non-small cell lung cancer, which can afflict nonsmokers. A Republican, he served 12 terms in the House of...

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Real ID Deadline Looms Htk Htk Htk Htk Htjk

Concord — New Hampshire driver’s licenses will continue to be acceptable identification for those boarding flights for at least five months, and if the Legislature changes state law, they will probably remain acceptable until each license expires. A recent New York Times article about the Department of Homeland Security growing impatient with states that haven’t gotten in line with the federal Real ID law, which sets certain standards...

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Consumer Confidential: Supreme Court’s Arbitration Ruling Is Another Blow to Consumer Rights

The U.S. Supreme Court made it clear earlier this month that, regardless of what the Constitution says about a consumer’s right to sue, businesses are absolutely entitled to block people from banding together and taking a dispute to court. It was the court’s latest ruling in favor of arbitration, rather than class-action lawsuits, as a preferred method for resolving issues between companies and their customers — which is exactly how...

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Effort to Ease Shortage Of Physicians Faces Long Delays, Criticism

Jefferson City, Mo. — A new Missouri law offered a first-of-its-kind solution to the physician shortage plaguing thousands of U.S. communities: Medical school graduates could start treating patients immediately, without wading through years of traditional residency programs. Following Missouri’s lead, similar measures were enacted in Arkansas and Kansas and considered in Oklahoma. The idea appeared to be a new model for delivering...

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